Publication

When can overambitious seeding cost you?

Applied Network Science


Abstract

In the classic “influence-maximization” (IM) problem, people influence one another to adopt a product and the goal is to identify people to “seed” with the product so as to maximize long-term adoption. Many influence-maximization models suggest that, if the number of people who can be seeded is unconstrained, then it is optimal to seed everyone at the start of the IM process. In a recent paper, we argued that this is not necessarily the case for social products that people use to communicate with their friends (Iyer and Adamic, The costs of overambitious seeding of social products. In: International Workshop on Complex Networks and Their Applications_273–286, 2018). Through simulations of a model in which people repeatedly use such a product and update their rate of subsequent usage depending upon their satisfaction, we showed that overambitious seeding can result in people adopting in suboptimal contexts, having bad experiences, and abandoning the product before more favorable contexts for adoption arise. Here, we extend that earlier work by showing that the costs of overambitious seeding also appear in more traditional threshold models of collective behavior, once the possibility of permanent abandonment of the product is introduced. We further demonstrate that these costs can be mitigated by using conservative seeding approaches besides those that we explored in the earlier paper. Synthesizing these results with other recent work in this area, we identify general principles for when overambitious seeding can be of concern in the deployment of social products.

Related Publications

All Publications

Understanding What Software Engineers Are Working On

Ralf Lämmel, Alvin Kerber, Liane Praza

ICPC Industry Track - May 14, 2020

Ownership at Large – Open Problems and Challenges in Ownership Management

John Ahlgren, Maria Eugenia Berezin, Kinga Bojarczuk, Elena Dulskyte, Inna Dvortsova, Johann George, Natalija Gucevska, Mark Harman, Shan He, Ralf Lämmel, Erik Meijer, Silvia Sapora, Justin Spahr-Summers

ICPC Industry Track - May 14, 2020

Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood: Comparing Intentions and Perceptions in Online Discussions

Jonathan Chang, Justin Cheng, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil

CHI - April 20, 2020

WES: Agent-based User Interaction Simulation on Real Infrastructure

John Ahlgren, Maria Eugenia Berezin, Kinga Bojarczuk, Elena Dulskyte, Inna Dvortsova, Johann George, Natalija Gucevska, Mark Harman, Ralf Lämmel, Erik Meijer, Silvia Sapora, Justin Spahr-Summers

Genetic Improvement Workshop - April 29, 2020

To help personalize content, tailor and measure ads, and provide a safer experience, we use cookies. By clicking or navigating the site, you agree to allow our collection of information on and off Facebook through cookies. Learn more, including about available controls: Cookies Policy