Publication

Self-censorship on Facebook

AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media (ICWSM)


Abstract

We report results from an exploratory analysis examining “last-minute” self-censorship, or content that is filtered after being written, on Facebook. We collected data from 3.9 mil-lion users over 17 days and associate self-censorship behavior with features describing users, their social graph, and the interactions between them.

Our results indicate that 71% of users exhibited some level of last-minute self-censorship in the time period, and provide specific evidence supporting the theory that a user’s “perceived audience” lies at the heart of the issue: posts are censored more frequently than comments, with status updates and posts directed at groups censored most frequently of all sharing use cases investigated.

Furthermore, we find that: people with more boundaries to regulate censor more; males censor more posts than females and censor even more posts with mostly male friends than do females, but censor no more comments than females; people who exercise more control over their audience censor more content; and, users with more politically and age diverse friends censor less, in general.

Related Publications

All Publications

EC - December 23, 2020

Matching Algorithms for Blood Donation

Duncan C. McElfresh, Christian Kroer, Sergey Pupyrev, Eric Sodomka, Karthik Abinav Sankararaman, Zack Chauvin, Neil Dexter, John P. Dickerson

CODE - November 20, 2020

Privacy-Preserving Randomized Controlled Trials: A Protocol for Industry Scale Deployment (Extended Abstract)

Mahnush Movahedi, Benjamin M. Case, Andrew Knox, Li Li, Yiming Paul Li, Sanjay Saravanan, Shubho Sengupta, Erik Taubeneck

arXiv - October 9, 2020

Weights and Methodology Brief for the COVID-19 Symptom Survey by University of Maryland and Carnegie Mellon University, in Partnership with Facebook

Neta Barkay, Curtiss Cobb, Roee Eilat, Tal Galili, Daniel Haimovich, Sarah LaRocca, Katherine Morris, Tal Sarig

CSCW - October 17, 2020

Country Differences in Social Comparison on Social Media

Justin Cheng, Moira Burke, Bethany de Gant

To help personalize content, tailor and measure ads, and provide a safer experience, we use cookies. By clicking or navigating the site, you agree to allow our collection of information on and off Facebook through cookies. Learn more, including about available controls: Cookies Policy