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48 Results

April 21, 2018

Feeling Speech on the Arm

Computer Human Interaction (CHI)

In this paper, we introduce a transcutaneous language communication (TLC) system that transmits a tactile representation of spoken or written language to the arm.

By: Jennifer Chen, Pablo Castillo, Robert Turcott, Ali Israr, Frances Lau
April 21, 2018

Towards Pleasant Touch: Vibrotactile Grids for Social Touch Interactions

Computer Human Interaction (CHI)

In this paper, we realize a wearable tactile device that delivers smooth pleasant strokes, those resemble of caressing and calming sensations, on the forearm.

By: Ali Israr, Freddy Abnousi
March 25, 2018

A Social Haptic Device to Create Continuous Lateral Motion Using Sequential Normal Indentation

IEEE Haptics Symposium (HAPTICS)

This paper presents a device for creating a continuous lateral motion on the arm to mimic a subset of the gestures used in social touch.

By: Heather Culbertson, Cara M. Nunez, Ali Israr, Frances Lau, Freddy Abnousi, Allison M. Okamura
March 25, 2018

Toward Improved Surgical Training: Delivering Smoothness Feedback using Haptic Cues

IEEE Haptics Symposium (HAPTICS)

In this paper, we explore the effectiveness of providing real-time feedback of movement smoothness, a characteristic associated with skilled and coordinated movement, via a vibrotactile cue. Subjects performed a mirror-tracing task that requires coordination and dexterity similar in nature to that required in endovascular surgery.

By: William H. Jantscher, Shivam Pandey, Priyanshu Agarwal, Sadie H. Richardson, Bowie R. Lin, Michael D. Byrne, Marcia K. O’Malley
October 9, 2017

Labeling And Direction Of Slider Questions

International Journal of Market Research

Using a web survey experiment, this study examines measurement comparability between two radio button questions (fully labelled and endpoint labelled) with slider questions unique to web surveys.

By: Mingnan Liu
July 24, 2017

Untagging on Social Media: Who Untags, What do they Untag, and Why?

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

Using de-identified, aggregated behavioral data from Facebook and a survey of 802 people, this paper aims to explore untagging by asking whether untagging occurs similarly to other self-presentation behavior and how people view this strategy.

By: Jeremy Birnholt, Moira Burke, Annie Steele
May 30, 2017

Sensors for Future VR Applications

International Image Sensor Workshop (IISW)

In this paper, we provide examples of some tracking and mapping functions of virtual reality sensors that illustrate the critical requirements and performance metrics. The sensor performance, form factor, power, and data bandwidth are the main challenges in a battery powered, always on VR devices.

By: Chiao Liu, Michael Hall, Renzo De Nardi, Nicholas Trail, Richard Newcombe
May 6, 2017

Paradigm shift from Human Computer Interaction to Integration

Computer Human Interaction (CHI)

In 1960, JCR Licklider forecast three phases: human- computer interaction, human-computer symbiosis, and ultra-intelligent machines. Human-computer symbiosis or what we call “integration” is already well under way. This SIG will discuss how the CHI community should think about the paradigm shift from interaction to integration as designers, practitioners, researchers, and as a society.

By: Umer Farooq, Jonathan T. Grudin
April 24, 2017

Connective recovery in social networks after the death of a friend

Nature Human Behavior

Most individuals have few close friends, leading to potential isolation after a friend’s death. Do social networks heal to fill the space left by the loss? We conduct such a study of self-healing and resilience in social networks.

By: William Hobbs, Moira Burke
April 3, 2017

Understanding Short-term Changes in Online Activity Sessions

World Wide Web (WWW)

Using data from the online social networking site Facebook, we uncover temporal patterns at a much smaller time scale: within individual sessions.

By: Farshad Kooti, Karthik Subbian, Winter Mason, Lada Adamic, Kristina Lerman