Rupert is a 4th year Ph.D. student at Duke University advised by Vincent Conitzer, having received his BSc from the University of Auckland. Rupert’s research lies at the intersection of computer science and economics, and he is particularly interested in problems that involve combining the preferences of multiple agents into a single agreeable decision.

Research Summary

Rupert is generally interested in the field of computational social choice, which encompasses areas such as fair division and voting theory. Problems in this domain often involve a trade off between incentive compatibility, fairness, and welfare maximization, generally without being allowed the use of money as a design tool. One particular area of focus for Rupert is to take results that are helpful for dividing items among a set of agents for private use, and apply them to novel settings. These settings include public decision making, like choosing representatives or the location of a new public facility, allocating shared computational resources among a group of machines, and guaranteeing fairness when multiple decisions are made over time.